Beechcroft Community Allotments: Planting for 2016

I took an executive decision today and decided to work at Beechcroft community allotment plots on account of the change in weather which will begin tomorrow. since I needed to plant out overwintering garlic and onions before the arrival of first frost, I wasn’t taking any chances.

So today’s work up at the Beechcroft site in Darcy Lever has concentrated on clearing unused raised beds of plants, roots, weeds etc then planting on garlic cloves and Japanese onions which will be ready to crop in June/July of 2016.

One of the beds before work started.

One of the beds before work started.

Cleared of all weeds, roots, rotting spuds and plants.

Cleared of all weeds, roots, rotting spuds and plants.

This is important for two reasons, firstly it means that idle raised beds on the site are being used, and secondly it means that we have an early crop next year. Along with the onions and garlic I also planted around twenty Kale plants, and moved and sorted through hundreds of strawberry plants, some of which were also planted on for next year. Accross the course of the day I managed to sort out three raised beds, and almost cleared a fourth, there will be much in the way of crops next year which will go towards addressing some of the issues around food access.

A tray of Kale ready to grow in the ground and my wood gas stove boiling water for a brew

A tray of Kale plant and my wood gas stove boiling water for a brew

three beds, cleared and planted with hardy produce.

three beds, cleared and planted with hardy produce.

 

 

In increasingly irrational economic times growing food over the winter makes more sense than it ever has, and it is this uncertainty that can address in a more resilient way by growing some of our own resources. Bolton is being hammered by Government cuts, I would suggest to all if they are able that they get out in their gardens and yards and grow whatever they can, the more food we have, the less poverty!

Steve

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