Growing clinic @ Beechcroft community allotments 23rd August

One of the things that I really love about these community allotment sessions is the keenness and enthusiasm of the growers on the site, it is such a joy to see and pleasure to connect with them when they are as fired up as this group of people are. For today’s session I gave the growers the remainder of the winter lettuce and turnip seeds for them to sow into their respective raised beds. Today we discussed pruning and taking cuttings from fruit bushes, and holding a ‘making things from blackberries’ session, which will happen on my next visit in three weeks time. we also discussed a plan for the kids growing area which is coming along nicely with the kids managing to grow nasturtiums, tomatoes and broccoli. After a quick tour of the site, despite the cooling of the weather is still brimming with crops. Today’s other jobs on the site consisted of providing advice and guidance about a range of subjects from sowing seeds, care of squashes to setting up a small constituted community group. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Tackling food issues head on

By growing processing their own food, the Beechcroft community have ensured that they have access to cleanly grown organic food, this has saved members a lot of money over the growing season, and has also provided them food that has a greater nutritional content than the fruit and vegatables for sale at their local supermarkets. This group are quite aware of the implications that their food growing has, and are confident enough to further develop this as they move towards community self sufficiency, which in uncertain economic times gives them a level of resilience and independence from the Markets that are causing so much strife for people and planet alike.

One of the training beds we set up in July, brimming with Kale, cabbages, and french climbing beans.

One of the training beds we set up in July, brimming with Kale, cabbages, and french climbing beans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steve

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